Parenting Bulletin    
Recent News |  Archives |  Tags |  Newsletter |  Message Board/Forum |  About |  Links |  Subscribe to ParentingBulletin.com RSS Feed Subscribe


More Articles
Improvements in fuel cell designImprovements in fuel cell design

Rediscovering Venus to find faraway earths

Archaeologists discover bronze remains of Iron Age chariot

Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science

Fish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fishFish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fish

New 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiencyNew 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiency

Researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiberResearchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber

Magnetic mirrors enable new technologies by reflecting light in uncanny ways

Structure of an iron-transport protein revealedStructure of an iron-transport protein revealed

First step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagusFirst step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagus

Lift weights, improve your memory

Spiders: Survival of the fittest group

Autophagy helps fast track stem cell activationAutophagy helps fast track stem cell activation

Myelin vital for learning new practical skillsMyelin vital for learning new practical skills

More physical activity improved school performanceMore physical activity improved school performance

Around the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red foxAround the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red fox

Engineering new vehicle powertrainsEngineering new vehicle powertrains

Active aging is much more than exerciseActive aging is much more than exercise

Study: New device can slow, reverse heart failureStudy: New device can slow, reverse heart failure

Are the world's religions ready for ET?Are the world's religions ready for ET?

Gut bacteria, artificial sweeteners and glucose intoleranceGut bacteria, artificial sweeteners and glucose intolerance

Recreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networksRecreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networks

Laying the groundwork for data-driven scienceLaying the groundwork for data-driven science

Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologiesNature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies

Missing piece found to help solve concussion puzzleMissing piece found to help solve concussion puzzle

Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'

Geography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economyGeography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economy

Identified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonationIdentified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonation

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

Parenting Bulletin - July 2011 Archives


Spare the rod and develop the child (7/31/2011)

Children in a school that uses corporal punishment performed significantly worse in tasks involving "executive functioning" -- psychological processes such as planning, abstract thinking, and delaying gratification -- than those in a school relying on milder disciplinary measures such as time-outs, according to a new study involving two private schools in a West African country. ...> Full Article


Study: Some moms 'doppelgang' their daughters' style (7/30/2011)

How much do our children influence our consumption behavior? More than we thought. A new study by a Temple University Fox School of Business professor finds that teenage girls have a strong influence on the products their mothers buy solely for personal use, as in makeup or clothing, and that mothers have a much stronger tendency to mimic their daughters' consumption behavior than vice versa. ...> Full Article


Children eating more, and more frequently outside the home (7/29/2011)

According to a study conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and published in the August 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, eating location and food source significantly impact daily energy intake for children. Foods prepared away from home, including fast food eaten at home and store-prepared food eaten away from home, are fueling the increase in total calorie intake. ...> Full Article


Hiding vegetables in kids' foods can increase vegetable intake (7/28/2011)

Preschool children consumed nearly twice as many vegetables and 11 percent fewer calories over the course of a day when researchers Penn State added pureed vegetables to the children's favorite foods. ...> Full Article


Working mothers and the effects on children (7/24/2011)

Parents struggling to combine paid work with bringing up their children now have some positive news thanks to a new study funded by the Economic and Social Research Council on maternal employment and child socio-emotional behavior in the UK. ...> Full Article


Mothers with breastfeeding difficulties more likely to suffer postpartum depression (7/23/2011)

Mothers with breastfeeding difficulties more likely to suffer postpartum depressionWomen who have breastfeeding difficulties in the first two weeks after giving birth are more likely to suffer postpartum depression two months later compared to women without such difficulties, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ...> Full Article


Stronger social safety net leads to decrease in stress, childhood obesity (7/22/2011)

Stronger social safety net leads to decrease in stress, childhood obesitySocial safety net programs that reduce psychosocial stressors for low-income families also ultimately lead to a reduction in childhood obesity, according to research by University of Illinois economist Craig Gundersen. ...> Full Article


Speed limit on babies' vision (7/22/2011)

Babies have far less ability to recognize rapidly changing images than adults, according to research from the UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain. The results show that while infants can perceive flicker or movement, they may not be able to identify the individual elements within a moving or changing scene as well as an adult. ...> Full Article


Accentuating the positive may eliminate the negative in teenagers with anxiety (7/21/2011)

Training teenagers to look at social situations positively could help those with anxiety and may help prevent problems persisting into adult life, new research from Oxford University is beginning to suggest. The researchers found that tasks designed to prompt either positive or negative interpretations of unclear situations can shift how healthy teenagers think about such events. The research has been published in the Springer journal Child Psychiatry and Human Development. ...> Full Article


Family meals remain important through teen years, expert says (7/20/2011)

As children become teenagers, it may be more challenging to regularly include them in family meals, but doing so is key to heading off such problems as eating disorders, obesity, and inadequate nutrition in adolescence, said Barbara Fiese, director of the University of Illinois Family Resiliency Center. The results showed that teens who eat at least five meals a week with their families are 35 percent less likely to engage in disordered eating than teens who don't. ...> Full Article


Caffeine promotes drink flavor preference in adolescents (7/19/2011)

Research to be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, indicates that caffeine added to sugar-sweetened, carbonated beverages teaches adolescents to prefer those beverages. Researchers found that the amount of caffeine added to an unfamiliar beverage was correlated with how much teenagers liked that beverage. ...> Full Article


Family planning in conflict (7/18/2011)

Many areas of the world are at war and both the conflict and aftermath have dire consequences for the health of people affected. New research published in BioMed Central's open-access journal Conflict and Health reports that while women in war-torn areas want access to family planning, these services are often not available at local hospitals or health centers. This can lead to further deprivation and unintended pregnancy. ...> Full Article


Researchers present a study on the psychological adaptation of adopted children (7/17/2011)

A study on adaptation variables in children from international adoption processes carried out by UAB researchers shows that adopted children do not present differences in general when compared to non adopted children. They are also less likely to somatize psychological problems. Nevertheless, adopted children from Eastern European countries do present more problems than others in adaptation, attention span and interpersonal relations. ...> Full Article


Popular TV shows teach children fame is most important value, psychologists report (7/16/2011)

Fame is the #1 value emphasized by television shows popular with 9-11 year-olds -- a dramatic change in 10 years, UCLA psychologists report in a new study. From 1997 to 2007, being kind/helping others fell from #2 to #13, and tradition dropped from #4 to #15. The study assessed the values of popular television shows from 1967 to 2007, from "Andy Griffith" and "The Lucy Show" to "American Idol" and "Hannah Montana." ...> Full Article


Even before language, babies learn the world through sounds (7/15/2011)

It's not just the words, but the sounds of words that have meaning for us. This is true for children and adults, who can associate the strictly auditory parts of language -- vowels produced in the front or the back of the mouth, high or low pitch -- with blunt or pointy things, large or small things, fast-moving or long-staying things. ...> Full Article


Study challenges baby formula claim (7/15/2011)

Hypoallergenic baby formula does not reduce a baby's risk of developing allergies in later life, a Murdoch Children's Research Institute, the University of Melbourne and John Hunter Children's Hospital study has found. ...> Full Article


A mother's salt intake could be key to prenatal kidney development (7/14/2011)

New animal study has drawn an association between pregnant mothers' sodium intake and their newborn's kidney development. ...> Full Article


Infants learn to transfer knowledge by 16 months, study finds (7/13/2011)

Researchers have identified when an important milestone in infants' development occurs: the ability to transfer knowledge to new situations. In a series of studies, the researchers found that 8-month-olds had trouble using newly acquired knowledge in a different circumstance, but 16-month-olds could do so. ...> Full Article


Latest guide on child and adolescent psychiatry (7/12/2011)

The 4th edition of the "Concise Guide to Child & Adolescent Psychiatry," written by Children's Memorial Hospital's psychiatrists, Mina Dulcan, M.D., and Mary Beth Lake, M.D., was published in July by American Psychiatric Publishing. ...> Full Article


Girl's Puberty Book Project provides an international model for promoting female health in Africa (7/11/2011)

The onset of puberty is a critical moment for reaching girls with health messages and information, and the stakes are particularly high in countries where the HIV/AIDS epidemic rages and where threats to female reproductive health abound. Yet to date, the healthcare community in low-resource countries has tended to neglect this opportunity and instead concentrate efforts on young women who are older and of reproductive age. A multi-year project in Tanzania, the Girl's Puberty Book, addresses this gap. ...> Full Article


Children's hay fever relieved by cellulose power without adverse effects (7/10/2011)

A cellulose powder has been used increasingly for many years against allergic rhinitis. Still, there has been a shortage of scientific evidence for its efficacy in seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever), particularly in children. Now, however, scientists from the Sahlgrenska Academy and the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences at the University of Gothenburg have proven that the cellulose powder reduces symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis in children, without any adverse effects. ...> Full Article


Study: Most parents unaware of teen workplace risks (7/9/2011)

Most parents are unaware of the risks their teenagers face in the workplace and could do more to help them understand and prepare for those hazards, according to a new study. ...> Full Article


Effects of Asperger's syndrome noticeable in babies (7/8/2011)

People with Asperger's syndrome have problems with social interaction and attentiveness, and are also sensitive to noise and light. Several of these characteristics were evident to parents during their child's first two years, reveals Petra Dewrang's thesis in psychology at the University of Gothenburg. ...> Full Article


TV food advertising increases children's preference for unhealthy foods (7/8/2011)

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have found that children who watch adverts for unhealthy food on television are more likely to want to eat high-fat and high-sugar foods. ...> Full Article


Helping preterm babies get the best start (7/7/2011)

Babies born prematurely could be at greater risk of developing kidney diseases later in life according to a landmark study investigating the impacts of preterm birth on kidney development. ...> Full Article


Mobile phone derived electromagnetic fields can disturb learning (7/6/2011)

High frequency non-ionizing radiation, emitted by mobile phones, is redundantly matter of discussions. The effects of high frequency electromagnetic fields derived from mobile phones have been discussed since the 1950s. Neuroscientists from Bochum were now able to elucidate this question. For the first time, they provide proof that extremely high-powered electromagnetic fields indeed influence learning processes on the synaptic level within the brain, independent from other factors like stress. ...> Full Article


Adolescents' dieting and disordered eating behaviors continue into young adulthood (7/6/2011)

Adolescents who diet and develop disordered eating behaviors (unhealthy and extreme weight control behaviors and binge eating) carry these unhealthy practices into young adulthood and beyond, according to a study conducted by University of Minnesota researchers and published in the July 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. ...> Full Article


Large numbers of birth defects seen near mountaintop mining operations (7/5/2011)

Large numbers of birth defects seen near mountaintop mining operationsBirth defects are significantly more common in areas of mountaintop coal mining and are on the rise as the practice becomes more common, according to a study by researchers at Washington State University and West Virginia University. ...> Full Article


Corporal punishment: Mothers' self-recorded audio gives unique real-time view of spanking (7/5/2011)

In a new corporal punishment study based on actual audio recordings, mothers spank, slap or hit their young children, sparking crying, tantrums and whimpering. Believed to be the first study of its kind, 37 mothers recorded up to 36 hours of interactions with their children, says psychologist George W. Holden, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. The data capture the moments before, during and after punishment, which ranged from spanking with a belt to admonishments while hitting. ...> Full Article


Fathers find financial crisis hits family life (7/4/2011)

Much coverage of the economic downturn has focused on its immediate impact, yet it is likely to hold long-term implications for family life. A research study "Changing Lives and Times" funded by the Economic and Social Research Council at Cardiff University has explored the impact of the financial crisis on the daily lives and future plans of new fathers, finding that several men were making significant life changes. ...> Full Article


Learning from mom boosts low-income kids' school readiness (7/3/2011)

Previous research says on average, children living in poverty are less well prepared to start school than children from middle-income homes. Now, new research says home learning experiences may help low-income children's school readiness. ...> Full Article


Parents prefer media content ratings system to age-based ratings in new national study (7/2/2011)

Parents prefer media content ratings system to age-based ratings in new national studyAlthough parents appreciate having media ratings systems to help protect their kids from questionable content in movies, video games and television, the current age-based system doesn't meet their needs, according to a new study led by Iowa State University's Douglas Gentile. The study found that parents would prefer media ratings that focus on detailed content information. ...> Full Article


Flexible schedule is key to keeping working moms on the job (7/1/2011)

Women who return to work after giving birth are more likely to stay on the job if they have greater control over their work schedules. Researchers also found that job security and the ability to make use of a variety of their job skills leads to greater retention of working moms, while the impact of work-related stress on their physical and mental health causes greater turnover. ...> Full Article


Search
New Articles
Certain parenting tactics could lead to materialistic attitudes in adulthoodCertain parenting tactics could lead to materialistic attitudes in adulthood

Even expectant dads experience prenatal hormone changes

A 2-minute delay in cutting the umbilical cord leads to a better development of newborns

Study finds low weight gain in pregnant women reduces male fetal survivalStudy finds low weight gain in pregnant women reduces male fetal survival

Prenatal exposure to common household chemicals linked with substantial drop in child IQ

Are you helping your toddler's aggressive behavior?

Punishing kids for lying just doesn't work

Higher birth weight indicates better performance in school

Are the benefits of breast milk stimulant worth the risk?

Many chest X-rays in children are unnecessaryMany chest X-rays in children are unnecessary

Why does physical activity during childhood matter?

Heavier newborns show academic edge in school

Why don't children belong to the clean plate club?Why don't children belong to the clean plate club?

New study examines the effect of timing of folic acid supplementation during pregnancy

Full-day preschool linked with increased school readiness compared with part-day



Archives
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010




Science Friends
Agricultural Science
Astronomy News
Biology News
Biomimicry Science
Cognitive Research
Chemistry News
Tissue Engineering
Cancer Research
Cybernetics Research
Electonics Research
Forensics Report
Fossil News
Genetic Archaeology
Genetics News
Geology News
Nanotech News
Microbiology Research
Physics News
  Archives |  Submit News |  Advertise With Us |  Contact Us |  Links
Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. All contents © 2000 - 2018 ParentingBulletin.com. All rights reserved.